Cambridge University Press Pulled its RSS Feeds — Bloggers and Publishers, Please Help Your Readers

Have you ever wondered why many publishers of scientific information don’t provide RSS feeds? I know I have. Continue reading Cambridge University Press Pulled its RSS Feeds — Bloggers and Publishers, Please Help Your Readers

Left is Hiring Technical Staff in Metro-Vancouver Canada for Wave and Yo!

Yesterday I sung the praises of Left who on Thursday won the Wireless Broadband Alliance Industry’s Best Wireless Innovation and Excellence in Social Impact Award for their wave product.

Today I’m letting you know that Left is hiring technical staff.

Continue reading Left is Hiring Technical Staff in Metro-Vancouver Canada for Wave and Yo!

The Benefits of Corporate Romance: Left is Right for Me

As you might recall, at ISRE-2015 in Geneva, I presented a paper on romantic emotions (“limerence”), in the context of our affect regulation project. The thing about romance is that like other emotions it is a state characterized by a certain loss of control. Control of what? One’s thinking processes. Continue reading The Benefits of Corporate Romance: Left is Right for Me

Experiencing and Analyzing Emotions on a Perturbing Election Night

The U.S. election this evening provides me with a good opportunity to test my understanding of emotion and my emotion regulation practices, as will the future, particularly given the apparent results. Continue reading Experiencing and Analyzing Emotions on a Perturbing Election Night

AISB-2017 (Bath) Symposium: “Computational Modelling of Emotion: Theory and Applications”

At AISB 2017 (April, in Bath, England) there will be a Symposium on Computational Modelling of Emotion: Theory and Applications. The Symposium chairs are Dr. Dean Petters (Psychology) and Dr. David Moffatt (Computer Science).

Dr. Sylwia Hyniewska and I will submit a paper on emotion as perturbance, using insomnia and limerence as windows onto this phenomenon. Continue reading AISB-2017 (Bath) Symposium: “Computational Modelling of Emotion: Theory and Applications”

Fiction About Fiction: Dangers and Missed Opportunities in Processing Stories

For the most part, we process (“consume”) fiction, in its various forms, for divertisement. But fiction sometimes comes with a false bill of goods: that we will (somehow) learn (something) from it; we will walk away from the experience a better person. The promissory note is sometimes issued by the marketers of art. But it also figures in serious psychology of fiction. I have some cautions to add to this tale. And I would like to propose an exercise to help readers reflect on the transformational potential of fiction, and art more generally.

Continue reading Fiction About Fiction: Dangers and Missed Opportunities in Processing Stories

What Can You Learn from the Knowledge of Others?

Who would argue with this: “Learning is good in itself. The quality of performance —in work and personal endeavours — depends largely on prior learning”? Hence we should learn deliberately, and optimally. Now, if we are to devise better ways of learning, would it not help to have some explicit understanding of the different ways in which we can learn, or develop? I think so.

Continue reading What Can You Learn from the Knowledge of Others?