SharpBrains Article by Luc P. Beaudoin on Sleep Onset

SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking health and performance applications of neuroscience. Their mission is complementary to CogZest’s. It is:

to provide independent, research-based, information and guidance to navigate the growing cognitive and brain fitness market.

Today, SharpBrains published some of my thoughts on the subject of sleep onset.
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Mind Wandering about Paul R. Fleischman’s Lecture on Features of Meditation: Homeostasis, Meta-management and More

Last summer I blogged about using the method of loci to memorize a Buddhist lecture on art.

This past Tuesday, Lam Wong and I attend Dr. Paul R. Fleischman’s lecture at UBC on the “The Universal Features of Meditation”. We were asked to turn off our devices and refrain from using recording devices of any kind. I had brought pen and paper, but wasn’t sure whether they were taking mindfulness so far that I shouldn’t even take notes…
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Shedding Some Light on Night Shift in iOS 9.3

Given that cognitive productivity is influenced by the brain’s circadian mechanisms, and that information technology and other technology can interfere with these mechanisms, you might be interested in a recent blog post of mine on mySleepButton.com. The post is a response to the introduction of a Blue Light Reduction setting in the Display & Brightness panel of iOS 9.3.

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On Ruminating and Intrusive Thinking…

I’ve been thinking a lot about rumination recently… actually have been for quite a while. Obviously, rumination can  hinder productivity. Psychologists have looked at the dark-side of rumination, to the point of defining it as counterproductive.  However, some measure of obsession and tenacity is required in order to stick with and solve hard problems. The history of expertise and creativity in science are a testament to such tenacity. (See the discussion of cognitive miserliness and other thinking dispositions in Cognitive Productivity. [Footnote 1] )
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My 2015 Progress Update (to Feb 15)

Already mid-February! A good time to see whether I’m on track for my 2015 plans.

I’ve never published my personal progress reports online before. But I wanted to take a detailed look at the last few weeks. And it might be helpful to some of my collaborators, stakeholders, clients or customers, who only see a certain slice of my life. Also, it will give you a picture of the R&D behind the products I develop. I run different facets of my projects through different organizations ( CogZest, CogSci Apps Corp. and Simon Fraser University). It also illustrates the variety of tasks that small business leaders engage in.

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Insomnia Workshops: Designed to Promote Cognitive Productivity

I don’t usually blog about my workshops and presentations. But I thought I’d mention two workshops for School District 23 ( Okanagan) that I will give in Kelowna next Friday:

  1. Reading to learn with tablets and laptops.
  2. Getting more and better sleep.

The first workshop is based on my book, Cognitive Productivity: Using Knowledge to Become Profoundly Effective, which itself is based on extensive research.

The second workshop is based on my research on sleep onset and insomnia, which is described at SFU, on mySleepButton and elsewhere.

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Sleep Onset, The Cognitive Shuffle and Productivity: Our Presentation at the 2014 SFU Learning Together Conference

Sheryl Guloy and I will be giving a presentation on the cognitive shuffle and cognitive productivity on Friday May 9 at the SFU Learning Together 2014 Conference. That’s an annual conference put on by the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University.

The title of our presentation is:

Decreasing sleep-onset latency for better cognitive performance in faculty and students: Super-somnolent mentation and the new “cognitive shuffle” technique compared with monotonous imagery training.

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